Post-Fundamentalist Stress Disorder and evangelical hermeneutics – OT/NT (Schenk)

Ken Schenk, Indiana Wesleyan University, writes.

. . . Post-Fundamentalist Stress Disorder PFSD occurs when, after fighting to the death in the fundamentalist infantry, you find out that you’re not actually fighting for God but for a peculiar twentieth century cultural phenomenon. Like Paul, you realize you were a “zealot without knowledge.” You feel betrayed. You feel stupid. You feel angry. . .

The way that the New Testament interprets the OT provides one of the greatest bits of “naughty data,” if not the greatest, in the Copernican Revolution that is currently underfoot in evangelical hermeneutics. Evangelical hermeneutics, as an extension of Protestant hermeneutics, has insisted that the Bible alone is the authority over the Christian. As hermeneutical developments proceeded to understand original meaning more clearly, it became the “original meaning alone” is authoritative over a Christian.

But what if we were to find that, as it turns out, the New Testament itself does not interpret the OT in terms of its original meaning. Does this fact not deconstruct the entire hermeneutic? Does it not imply a controlling factor in interpretation beyond the text itself?

The Ptolemaic scientists of evangelicalism have not missed the potential threat to “normal science,” to their paradigm. They have launched a coping strategy, called Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old. The goal is to find as many connections as possible between the New Testament use of the Old Testament and anything that might smack of attention to original context. . .

Hmmmm.

Read Schenk’s whole post: Monday Enns – New Testament Interpretation of the Old

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3 thoughts on “Post-Fundamentalist Stress Disorder and evangelical hermeneutics – OT/NT (Schenk)

  1. Simon says:

    ”But what if we were to find that, as it turns out, the New Testament itself does not interpret the OT in terms of its original meaning.”

    Just because they didn’t do it like we do, doesn’t mean that we should do it like they did. Right?

    • Ben says:

      Unless doing it like they did means looking at the bigger picture, trajectories, etc. What’s the point? I think that’s the beauty of a Christotelic hermeneutic. 😉

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