Barna study on short-term mission trips

From the latest Barna Report: Despite Benefits, Few Americans Have Experienced Short-Term Mission Trips

. . . a majority said it changed their life in some way. The most common areas of personal growth that people recall – even years later – include becoming more aware of other people’s struggles (25%), learning more about poverty, justice, or the world (16%), increasing compassion (11%), deepening or enriching their faith (9%), broadening their spiritual understanding (9%), and boosting their financial generosity (5%). Others mentioned the experience helped them feel more fulfilled, become more grateful, develop new friends, and pray more. . .

“this research does not measure the benefit to the people being helped, since we only interviewed Americans for this project. But short-term missions clearly benefit the people providing the assistance.”

Read the full article here: Despite Benefits, Few Americans Have Experienced Short-Term Mission Trips

Observations:

  • This is a “self-reported” change in their life – about how they felt. I’m just curious, how much did their lifestyles actually change?
  • At least this honestly shows that short-term missions mainly serves the interests of the short term missionaries. I wish more people were honest about this fact. I appreciate those who come in a learning posture rather than trying to feel like they are doing the world a favor – the savior complex.

For more on short-term missions see the earlier post Short Term Missions or Religious Tourism and all the related links from RESOURCE ON SHORT-TERM MISSIONS at the bottom of Kurt Ver Beek’s page, (Calvin College)

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2 thoughts on “Barna study on short-term mission trips

  1. […] pretty ambivalent about what I call “missionary tourism” – Barna’s self reported results. There is even a safari company in Nairobi called “Missionary Tours.” At first I […]

  2. […] as we can make them seem. I’m pretty ambivalent about what I call “missionary tourism” – Barna’s self reported results. There is even a safari company in Nairobi called “Missionary Tours.” At first I […]

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